BritBike Forum logo
BritBike Sponsor BritBike Sponsor BritBike Sponsor
BritBike Sponsor

BritBike Sponsor

BritBike Sponsor
BritBike Sponsor BritBike Sponsor BritBike Sponsor
Jwood & co JRC Engineering dealers Jwood & co
Home | Sponsors, Newsletter | Regalia | Calendar | Bike Project | BritBike Museum | Spiders Cartoons, "OLD" BritBike Forum | DVD- Manuals & Parts books | BritBike Stickers & Decals
Upgrade to: Premium Membership | Premium Life Membership | Vendor Membership | Site Sponsor Membership
Member Spotlight
Spitfirebird
Spitfirebird
W MA, USA
Posts: 21
Joined: June 2006
Show All Member Profiles 
Shout Box
Search eBay for motorcycle parts in following countries
Australia, Canada, France, Holland, Italy, United Kingdom, USA
Random Gallery photo
Who's Online Now
18 registered members (Bluehighways), 216 guests, and 442 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
hondapete1950, Gaspare, eberhard, Norman Woollons, LandoLando
10257 Registered Users
Top Posters(30 Days)
Stuart 79
Lannis 56
Popular Topics(Views)
610,216 mail-order LSR
Forum Statistics
Forums34
Topics67,138
Posts651,510
Members10,257
Most Online3,995
Feb 13th, 2017
Like BritBike.com on Facebook

Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Rate Thread
Page 2 of 4 1 2 3 4
Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: Hillbilly bike] #725151
02/11/18 9:01 am
02/11/18 9:01 am
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,424
scotland
triton thrasher Offline
BritBike Forum member
triton thrasher  Offline
BritBike Forum member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,424
scotland
Originally Posted by Hillbilly bike

Be more interesting with a image of your scale reading grin



Too easy to fake!


Amateur Loctite enthusiast.
Support Your #1 BritBike Forum!

Check out British motorcycles for sale:
British Motorcycles on e-Bay UK, British motorcycles on e-Bay North America
Check out British motorcycles for sale:
British Motorcycles on e-Bay UK, British motorcycles on e-Bay North America
Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: tridentt150v] #725169
02/11/18 11:25 am
02/11/18 11:25 am
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 3,642
Running from demons in WNY
Hillbilly bike Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
Hillbilly bike  Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 3,642
Running from demons in WNY
Originally Posted by tridentt150v
Hillbilly....I just noticed from your photo that you are shaving the inner, but have also gripped the inner.

I would have thought you would clamp on the outer to shave the inner......or do you leave the steel part of the plate the same width and only remove bonded material???
Which means you carry unneeded weight I guess? But the photo looks like you are removing some steel/reducing the thickness of the plate?


I removed the friction material as shown only, left the steel as is, more or less...The added weight isn't important...And my lathe chuck won't grip the OD grin


650 Triumph modified production LSR record holder 133.1 MPH... Twin 650 engine Triumph LSR that goes sorta fast...
Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: gavin eisler] #725177
02/11/18 12:25 pm
02/11/18 12:25 pm
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 9,879
Scotland
S
Stuart Offline
BritBike Forum member
Stuart  Offline
BritBike Forum member
S
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 9,879
Scotland
Hi,

Originally Posted by Hillbilly bike
I also believe that the shape of the lever affects how the clutch feels...In my opinion, stock Triumph levers are not shaped well for riders with smaller hands...

+1. With original chromed steel levers on the T160's, especially in town with lots of gear-changing, I used to find my fingers migrating along the lever towards the pivot, which didn't do anything for the effort required to pull the lever. frown One of the reasons I fitted '79-on handlebar switch clusters to my T160's was the very late Co-op dog-leg levers. bigt

Originally Posted by gavin eisler
I think the lever fitted currently was a Wassel item,
pull,
3 kgs , ~ 6.5 Lbs
I know it could be lighter still,

Talking of '79-on Co-op stuff, have you looked if the clutch lever will fit in the '71 pivot castings? The dog-leg levers are rocking-horse poo but both they and the earlier and more-common curved levers are 1" pivot-to-nipple.

Originally Posted by gavin eisler
3 ball mech,
1.125" pulls the 71 mech too far, slackened the cable, click begone.

A while back, John Healy pointed out that, when the Co-op fitted the black '79-on handlebar switch clusters, with the 1" lever, they also changed the mechanism in the gearbox outer cover; this mechanism has the "X"-marked lever.

Hth,

Regards,

Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: Stuart] #725179
02/11/18 12:54 pm
02/11/18 12:54 pm
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 3,642
Running from demons in WNY
Hillbilly bike Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
Hillbilly bike  Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 3,642
Running from demons in WNY
Originally Posted by Stuart
Hi,

Originally Posted by Hillbilly bike
I also believe that the shape of the lever affects how the clutch feels...In my opinion, stock Triumph levers are not shaped well for riders with smaller hands...

+1. With original chromed steel levers on the T160's, especially in town with lots of gear-changing, I used to find my fingers migrating along the lever towards the pivot, which didn't do anything for the effort required to pull the lever. frown One of the reasons I fitted '79-on handlebar switch clusters to my T160's was the very late Co-op dog-leg levers. bigt

Hth,

Regards,


Now we have to define a small hand grin People say I have large hands...From the tip of the index finger to the junction of the palm to wrist is about 8 inches....and a clutch with a vague or sudden engagement point can be tiring in traffic even it it's easy to pull the lever in...
Many Triumphs I have ridden, the clutch action feels "mushy" ,most likely a cable problem...


650 Triumph modified production LSR record holder 133.1 MPH... Twin 650 engine Triumph LSR that goes sorta fast...
Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: TR7RVMan] #725184
02/11/18 2:15 pm
02/11/18 2:15 pm
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 9,879
Scotland
S
Stuart Offline
BritBike Forum member
Stuart  Offline
BritBike Forum member
S
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 9,879
Scotland
Hi Don,

Originally Posted by TR7RVMan
The Featherlite started off good but after a few thousand miles the inner liner deteriorated & started balling up causing much friction.
I used no lube on liner as Venhill said do not lube.

Mmmm ... might say that but it doesn't say, "do not clean"; how often did you clean it and with what?

Venhill's FAQ says, "By lubricating you run the risk of clogging the cable and allowing dirt to stick to the surfaces." I've no idea how much testing Venhill did but heading for fifty years' first-hand experience of motorcycles says some dirt'll stick to anything, including stainless steel, whether it's lubricated or not. The inners of Bowden-type brake and clutch cables on motorcycles will get airborne and road dirt on 'em certainly at the handlebar lever end. Even if there's a close-fitting cover, which I've never seen on any Britbike lever. And you've posted, "I keep ... cable ends well lubed."

Then the movement of the inner within the outer when the lever's pulled and released will move any dirt between the inner and the outer. Whatever other magic properties Teflon and stainless steel have, there isn't one that fixes damage by foreign objects rubbed between 'em?

Originally Posted by TR7RVMan
Regarding friction of cable, I have only used motor oil for lube. I keep cable, lever, cable ends well lubed. I lube cable with bag of oil suspended like photo in workshop manual. Takes several hours to get clean oil flowing through. I usually leave overnight.

I've used Venhill cables since the mid-1980's, when oem triple clutch cables finally ran out. I've one of those clamp-on cable lubers that take an aerosol straw; I clean nylon-lined with WD40 and lube with Teflon or graphite spray, I just clean Teflon-lined with WD40 (as Venhill's FAQ advises). It takes longer to attach the cable luber than it does to clean (and lube) a cable. In the aforementioned near half-century, one clutch cable (nipple tight in the lever and not rotating eek) and one speedo. cable have broken. Never had a problem with any Featherlight cable, apart from the balls-ups Venhill make manufacturing 'em.

The clutch cable broke at the traffic lights a short level-road push from home. The broken speedo. cable led to my first visit to Paris being to an ... errr ... seedier ... area where the Triumph dealer was then located. That was a Venhill cable, that buggered the speedo. within a few miles, frown but that's another story.

Hth.

Regards,

Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: Hillbilly bike] #725185
02/11/18 2:28 pm
02/11/18 2:28 pm
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 9,879
Scotland
S
Stuart Offline
BritBike Forum member
Stuart  Offline
BritBike Forum member
S
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 9,879
Scotland
Hi,

Originally Posted by Hillbilly bike
Now we have to define a small hand grin
From the tip of the index finger to the junction of the palm to wrist is about 8 inches

~7 inches.

Or if you consider that you hand's normally around the handlebar grip with thumb underneath and fingers over the top, a better measurement might be from mid-way along the bit of skin between thumb and forefinger to end of middle (longest?) finger? ~5 inches.

laughing

Regards,

Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: Stuart] #725194
02/11/18 3:35 pm
02/11/18 3:35 pm
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 3,642
Running from demons in WNY
Hillbilly bike Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
Hillbilly bike  Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 3,642
Running from demons in WNY
Originally Posted by Stuart
Hi,

Originally Posted by Hillbilly bike
Now we have to define a small hand grin
From the tip of the index finger to the junction of the palm to wrist is about 8 inches

~7 inches.

Or if you consider that you hand's normally around the handlebar grip with thumb underneath and fingers over the top, a better measurement might be from mid-way along the bit of skin between thumb and forefinger to end of middle (longest?) finger? ~5 inches.

laughing

Regards,

About 5-5/8 ' for me..... On my race bike the feel of clutch and lever pull in effort was improved with the Venhill featerlite compared to a Barnett cable...;The Barnett inner cable I had was fairly stiff compared to the Venhill...Maybe not all Barnett cables are the same?...I do make up my own cables and use silver bearing soldier for the cable end pieces...Also making sure the cable is free to pivot on both ends.. I also do not sit at traffic lights with the clutch pulled in if it makes any difference..I lubricate all cables ,lined or not, with a very light oil "Lubritech" made for cable and sheath...I believe sewing machine oil would also be good...


650 Triumph modified production LSR record holder 133.1 MPH... Twin 650 engine Triumph LSR that goes sorta fast...
Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: Hillbilly bike] #725202
02/11/18 4:48 pm
02/11/18 4:48 pm
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 223
seattle
T
tiumphdave Offline

BritBike Forum member
tiumphdave  Offline

BritBike Forum member
T
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 223
seattle
On the last clutch cable I replaced the flush (WD40) kept coming out the bottom rust- colored, no matter how much I flushed and cleared with the air hose. After lubing with 3-in-1 oil I tried the cable, still stiff. Replaced the cable, lubed it, and all was good- I mean WAY better. 6/7 years old with occasional lube, but not flushed.

Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: Hillbilly bike] #725211
02/11/18 6:01 pm
02/11/18 6:01 pm
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 3,870
argyll. scotland, uk
gavin eisler Offline
BritBike Forum member
gavin eisler  Offline
BritBike Forum member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 3,870
argyll. scotland, uk
I had to replace the Beesa clutch cable this year, it was circa vintage 1990 and nylon lined , the advice at the time was not to use oil as a lube because it would swell the lining, I think what happens eventually is that the cable inner saws through the nylon liner, then its game over and heavy clutch, I have always kept the bar end covered , cables last a lot longer if rain isnt driven into them.. I have a similar device to Stuarts for skooshing in WD 40, great bit of kit, nylon lined cables do like that.

re 7 plate conversions, are the plates all thinner so the stack height is the same as the 6 plate? I am messing around at the mo with a pile of old worn plates trying to get a 6.5 plate set up like TTs, seeing how much it fills the basket, even selecting the thinnest plates I can find its not working out , I know for sure if the stack is even a wee bit taller I will have problems with the centre adjuster saying hello to the primary inspection cap. My clutch as fitted is fresh , new plates and frictions, on assembly I had to trim the adjuster lock nut to win clearance. i think some of this lack of room is the extra thickness of the Alloy pressure plate, plus the primary case may not be as accommodating as it once was, the footrest dented it , its been welded up but I maybe lost a bit of space at the same time.

Last edited by gavin eisler; 02/11/18 6:05 pm.

71 Devimead A65 750
56 Norbsa 68 Longstroke A65
Cagiva Raptor 650
MZ TS 250
The poster formerly known as Pod
Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: Hillbilly bike] #725216
02/11/18 6:11 pm
02/11/18 6:11 pm
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,424
scotland
triton thrasher Offline
BritBike Forum member
triton thrasher  Offline
BritBike Forum member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,424
scotland
I've got the old tin pressure plate and a thick gasket on the primary case.

Oh- and no adjuster in the pressure plate.

Last edited by triton thrasher; 02/11/18 6:14 pm.

Amateur Loctite enthusiast.
Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: Hillbilly bike] #725373
02/12/18 11:12 pm
02/12/18 11:12 pm
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 401
Pleasant Hill, California USA
T
TR7RVMan Offline
BritBike Forum member
TR7RVMan  Offline
BritBike Forum member
T
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 401
Pleasant Hill, California USA
Hi Gavin, I only have personal experience with Hyde 7 plate.

The Hyde steel plates are same thickness as Triumph. The steel of the friction plates is same a Triumph also. They make up space for extra plates in thickness of friction pads.
They are very very thin. You'd think they'd wear out quickly, but seem to last very well. Friction material is a modern compound of some sort. Not cork like at all.

Hyde suggests soaking them with primary oil prior to assembly. I've always done that to good results.

So stack height of 7 plate is same as Triumph 6 plate. Total plate stack new plates Triumph or Hyde is 1.370". There is a little variation, but that's very close.

1 Triumph friction plate overall is .151" thick on average, while Hyde friction is .114" overall. Steel is .082" thick. These are averages, but again very close.

I've found the thickness tolerance of Hyde plates to be very close from kit to kit.

However aftermarket 6 plate friction thickness new is all over the place. A few years ago were so thick I was afraid the outer steelll was going to fall out of grooves with lever pulled. Ended up sending 6 plate back & installing Hyde 7 plate. Obviously 7 plate kit is far more costly but owner decided to purchase it.

When I work with used plates, I measure stack height of old parts. Then subtract that from new stack height & go that much deeper on base spring nut position. I set base position with stud end flush with dome on nut. Go the extra deeper from calculation, then adjust wobble from there. If plates are thicker, I back off nuts by that amount.

So if you can find worn plates such that 7 would fit, then measure stack height, calculate nut position from that. I don't know how far out spring nuts can be without rubbing cover, but test fitting without gasket may give a clue. I don't know about pressure plate rubbing either.

What if you removed friction on back of 1st plate in basket? That would give a little more room. I've not tried that. Some speak of bending tangs on last steel plate. I've not done that either.

A factor of the 7 plate is the inner diameter of the friction pads is much greater than stock plate. This concentrates more pressure in a smaller area. It is said the effect creates more friction that normal 6 plate, yet has less area for drag. The inside circle of Hyde friction is 5.075", while Triumph is 4.275".

The Hyde has more smaller friction pads, But if you add up the area on one side of plate, Hyde is about 4.248 square inches, while Triumph is 7.872 square inches.

In practice using same primary oil, whether engine oil or ATF the Hyde has less slip & frees easier that Triumph 6 plate.

Using stronger springs such as 750 spring gives plates much more grip, but the down side is more lever effort & more strain on clutch cable.

Last years Triumph 750 twin had their version of 7 plate which had friction glued to basket. The friction pads were thinner, but not so thin as Hyde. This allowed 650 springs to be used. I've personally felt the lever & it was very easy to pull. The owner said it freed good & no slip.

It doesn't seem to matter one way or the other using stock pressure plate or alloy. This may fly in the face of convention, but I feel the alloy allows more oil to plates which may be beneficial. I don't know.

I don't know if oil swells friction pads or not. However they will be oil soaked during operation. The oil in basket does indeed exchange itself during riding. I've worked on several machines that clutch dragged or slipped & changed only oil & it cured problem. Takes 20-100 miles. If not ok in 100 miles, oil will not help & has other problems.

Every Triumph I've ridden the lever gains free play when motor/trans are heat soaked. I don't know why. Either plates are expanding hot, or case is expanding, but the lever gains free play & the clutch looses a corresponding amount of lift.

Regarding adjuster screw hitting primary cover plug, that is very common on 750 twin. Triumph issued a bulletin on shortening screw. Thicker or thinner plates does not change position of screw, but it does nut. I've cut several screws shorter & re slotted them.

I recently learned from Stuart the thick fiber seal on plug was superseded to the familiar o-ring which made problem worse. Even more recently I learned from him that various
iterations of primary covers were made under the same part #. That is my understanding anyway. That explains a lot as I I've had friends buy covers that now rubbed where the original didn't. Visually they looked the same but were not.

Seems the more I learn, the more I have to learn.
Don

Last edited by TR7RVMan; 02/12/18 11:20 pm. Reason: changed sentence

1973 Tiger 750
Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: Hillbilly bike] #725452
02/13/18 5:43 pm
02/13/18 5:43 pm
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 3,870
argyll. scotland, uk
gavin eisler Offline
BritBike Forum member
gavin eisler  Offline
BritBike Forum member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 3,870
argyll. scotland, uk
@ Don, thanks for a very informative post, fessing up here , my clutch is on an A65 , but its the same thing.
You have put my mind at rest about the 7 plate mod, it sounds like a good bit of kit, I had to mess around with different centre inspection plugs , thick O ring , filing down the adjuster nut, pushrod fine tuning , and filing a bit off the alloy plate to make it work with the new six plate stack, V interesting what you say about varying stack heights depending on plate suppliers, I recall the new plain plates fitted were all 80 thou plus, the old worn ones that came out were more like 75 , the thinner ones were the most warped, cant remember who supplied the plates. I think I will go for the 7 plate stuff based on your info, thanks again.
Regarding lube, I change the ATF at roughly 1K intervals, and I also get the same slack developing when all up to temp, particularly round town, as long as the plates are running true it doesnt cause any bother. After the initial bed down the clutch slack when warm diminished.

30 years ago, when it had been running with 7 worn thin plates, still slipped and dragged! , I rebuilt the clutch with fresh friction plates , then set off for Glasgow, 80 miles away, all good till I hit the sequence of traffic lights on the great Western Road, by the end of the GWR, the clutch had stopped working, I had to strip the primary in a car park, used a pop can to catch the oil, remove a pair of plates and then rebuild, what pure joy that was.


71 Devimead A65 750
56 Norbsa 68 Longstroke A65
Cagiva Raptor 650
MZ TS 250
The poster formerly known as Pod
Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: HawaiianTiger] #725626
02/14/18 10:11 pm
02/14/18 10:11 pm
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 275
Melbourne Oz
S
Steven A Offline
BritBike Forum member
Steven A  Offline
BritBike Forum member
S
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 275
Melbourne Oz
Originally Posted by HawaiianTiger
Last week, we had a ball ramp unit fail in service. This unit is swaged together and the center shaft just pulled through the plate. It was repairable, but we opted for a new one at around 54$ from British Only.
The bike had 750 springs in the clutch.
Those manly clutches take a toll on the whole system.
The 7 plate clutch I recently installed has 500 springs in it. You could pull it with one finger. No slipping. It's a true wonder.

Cheers,
Bill


That's what I did. Works very well.

Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: Hillbilly bike] #725638
02/14/18 11:40 pm
02/14/18 11:40 pm
Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,522
Farmington,Connecticut,USA
JBMorris Offline
BritBike Forum member
JBMorris  Offline
BritBike Forum member
Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,522
Farmington,Connecticut,USA
'Rask Cycle' recommends WD40 mixed with powdered graphite for cables- 'that little bottle you bought for the fishing rod- but never used!


1978 Bonneville T140V PX
Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: triton thrasher] #725653
02/15/18 2:16 am
02/15/18 2:16 am
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 3,923
ohio, usa
kevin roberts Offline
fefsa
kevin roberts  Offline
fefsa
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 3,923
ohio, usa
Originally Posted by triton thrasher
I've got the old tin pressure plate and a thick gasket on the primary case.

Oh- and no adjuster in the pressure plate.



what?


live every day.
die once.
Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: kevin roberts] #725668
02/15/18 5:58 am
02/15/18 5:58 am
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 5,848
Maui Hawaii
HawaiianTiger Offline

BritBike Forum member
HawaiianTiger  Offline

BritBike Forum member
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 5,848
Maui Hawaii
Originally Posted by kevin roberts
Originally Posted by triton thrasher
I've got the old tin pressure plate and a thick gasket on the primary case.

Oh- and no adjuster in the pressure plate.



what?

Pre units don't have them.

Cheers,
Bill


Bikes
1974 Commando
1985 Honda Nighthawk 650
1957 Thunderbird/T110 "Flying Tiger"
Antique Fans: Loads of Emersons (Two six wingers) plus gyros and orbiters.
Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: kevin roberts] #725669
02/15/18 6:33 am
02/15/18 6:33 am
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,424
scotland
triton thrasher Offline
BritBike Forum member
triton thrasher  Offline
BritBike Forum member
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,424
scotland
Originally Posted by kevin roberts
Originally Posted by triton thrasher
I've got the old tin pressure plate and a thick gasket on the primary case.

Oh- and no adjuster in the pressure plate.



what?


The adjuster is at the other end of the pushrod.


Amateur Loctite enthusiast.
Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: Hillbilly bike] #725670
02/15/18 7:37 am
02/15/18 7:37 am
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 772
Skudeneshavn Norway
S
Stein Roger Online content

BritBike Forum member
Stein Roger  Online Content

BritBike Forum member
S
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 772
Skudeneshavn Norway
A year ago I fitted a 7 plate clutch to a T140E. I always fit the plates dry, don't know if it makes a difference but oiling them sort of feels counter intuitive to me.
I used 650 springs screwed down flush with the studs. Venhill Featherlight cable. The clutch worked like intended right from the start, with a very light pull and it neither slips nor drags.
After a good season on the road it's back with me for service, and it still works the same, but the cable lost its lever end nipple. I find that very strange with the light clutch action.
Years ago on my own tuned 6 plate T120 Bonnie with stiff springs I used to have to change them every season. I would have thought modern cables on a lighter clutch would have lasted several seasons. In fact, they don't seem to ever break on say a Hinckley Triumph or other modern bikes.

Sorry, no fish scale available at the moment...

Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: Stein Roger] #725681
02/15/18 11:12 am
02/15/18 11:12 am
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 3,642
Running from demons in WNY
Hillbilly bike Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
Hillbilly bike  Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 3,642
Running from demons in WNY
Originally Posted by Stein Roger
A year ago I fitted a 7 plate clutch to a T140E. I always fit the plates dry, don't know if it makes a difference but oiling them sort of feels counter intuitive to me.
I used 650 springs screwed down flush with the studs. Venhill Featherlight cable. The clutch worked like intended right from the start, with a very light pull and it neither slips nor drags.
After a good season on the road it's back with me for service, and it still works the same, but the cable lost its lever end nipple. I find that very strange with the light clutch action.
Years ago on my own tuned 6 plate T120 Bonnie with stiff springs I used to have to change them every season. I would have thought modern cables on a lighter clutch would have lasted several seasons. In fact, they don't seem to ever break on say a Hinckley Triumph or other modern bikes.

Sorry, no fish scale available at the moment...
.



That what Don TR7man was saying, the ends came off the Venhill cable.....I make up my cables using silver bearing soldier for the cable ends so I didn't have the problem even with heavy springs...
What? A Norwegian without a fish scale? grin


650 Triumph modified production LSR record holder 133.1 MPH... Twin 650 engine Triumph LSR that goes sorta fast...
Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: Hillbilly bike] #725708
02/15/18 4:23 pm
02/15/18 4:23 pm
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 772
Skudeneshavn Norway
S
Stein Roger Online content

BritBike Forum member
Stein Roger  Online Content

BritBike Forum member
S
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 772
Skudeneshavn Norway
Yeah I sleep with my toes in the sea, and I don't have a fish scale! facepalm
Will have to buy one ASAP before I'm excommunicated or something...

Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: Hillbilly bike] #725758
02/15/18 11:37 pm
02/15/18 11:37 pm
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 275
Melbourne Oz
S
Steven A Offline
BritBike Forum member
Steven A  Offline
BritBike Forum member
S
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 275
Melbourne Oz
A while back after working on my T140D clutch I set off for a test ride. I forgot install the brace piece that bolts to the underside of the tank. I usually run the clutch cable up over that piece so it runs beside the frame for 6 inches and then drops down to the gear box outer. I set off for a short spin with the clutch cable coming out from under the top triple clamp and hanging in mid air in one easy curve to the gear box outer. It as marvelous! Much better than usual.

The cable routing is very important! Unfortunately not possible to leave it there out in mid air.

Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: Hillbilly bike] #725778
02/16/18 7:04 am
02/16/18 7:04 am
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 401
Pleasant Hill, California USA
T
TR7RVMan Offline
BritBike Forum member
TR7RVMan  Offline
BritBike Forum member
T
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 401
Pleasant Hill, California USA
Hi Hillbilly, If you have he skills & equipment to properly solder cable ends you can do better than many factory soldered cables.

I have those skills & equipment also. Building choppers at Harley Davidson we got much experience making custom clutch cables. Those cables were really fat. I think Triumph cables might be more stressed??

However many riders don't have the capabilities to make & install cable ends stronger than Barnett.

In the field talking with owners, Barnett has given best service by far, especially with Barnett racing springs or 750 springs.

It seems Emgo has given poor service in my area. Some users have no trouble, but many have ends pulling off. They end up with no problems using Barnett.
Don


1973 Tiger 750
Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: Hillbilly bike] #725779
02/16/18 7:05 am
02/16/18 7:05 am
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 401
Pleasant Hill, California USA
T
TR7RVMan Offline
BritBike Forum member
TR7RVMan  Offline
BritBike Forum member
T
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 401
Pleasant Hill, California USA
Hillbilly, Hmmm, I live only 6 miles from the Sacramento river.... I don't have a fish scale either. I'll try to round one up & measure my pull.
Don


1973 Tiger 750
Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: TR7RVMan] #725796
02/16/18 12:59 pm
02/16/18 12:59 pm
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 3,642
Running from demons in WNY
Hillbilly bike Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
Hillbilly bike  Offline OP
BritBike Forum member
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 3,642
Running from demons in WNY
Don,the fish scale is primarily used to measure pull when adjusting steering stem bearings........You mentioned having the skills to make up control cables ....I think it's a matter of just doing your own rather than just buying a made part...In my shop of horrors there are failed experiments but I keep modifying the procedure until it works...The oiling supply in my double engine Triumph is a good example...I underestimated the G loads of the bike accelerating ( 100 rear wheel hp/ 450 pounds ). The oil tank is behind the rear engine with 3/8 supply hoses but the front engine got oil starved and wiped out the rod bearings.....the nitrided crank was undamaged . The single engine race bike engine also had scored bearings caused by debris and the nitrided crank laughed it off. For about 100 bucks having the crank nitrided also adds some fatigue resistence, you would like it ! Tony


650 Triumph modified production LSR record holder 133.1 MPH... Twin 650 engine Triumph LSR that goes sorta fast...
Re: Clutch pull effort [Re: Hillbilly bike] #725812
02/16/18 3:50 pm
02/16/18 3:50 pm
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 3,700
ca, us
D
DMadigan Offline
BritBike Forum member
DMadigan  Offline
BritBike Forum member
D
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 3,700
ca, us
So did you move the oil tank to the front of the bike or add an electric pump on the supply line?

Page 2 of 4 1 2 3 4

Moderated by  John Healy 


Home | Sponsors | Newsletter | Regalia | Calendar | Bike Project | BritBike Museum | Spiders Cartoons | "OLD" BritBike Forum | DVD- Manuals & Parts books | BritBike Stickers & Decals
Upgrade to: Premium Membership | Premium Life Membership | Vendor Membership | Site Sponsor Membership
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.1.1