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#725134 02/11/18 3:49 am
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All right, it’s time to get on with it. Turning 64 this year, and I’ve got projects in my shop that have been there waiting for me for 17 or 18 years. If I wait that long again, I’ll be 82 before I start and I don’t want that.

I really respect you guys that latch onto a project, and stick to it until you Git ‘Er Done like the man says. I enjoy reading those threads. Me, I’ve “stuck to” a lot of things in my life – 42 years married, raised two fine boys, Fay and I built our house with our own hands, successful jobs leading to a fun retirement, lots of things ….

… but I’m not getting it done with my shop projects. I have plenty of “My wife she … My dog it ….” excuses as to WHY I’m not getting it done (gardening, hobby-farming, traveling, cutting firewood, charitable volunteer work, grandchildren, etc.), but I’m not even fooling myself any more that I don’t have any time for the bikes.

Triless has been a help with gentle reminders to get moving on the old Matchless, and Shaun will not let me forget (thanks be) the Plan That Works to get ALL these things going. Maybe what I need are Accountability Partners (that would be any BritBike member that cares to be) to help me along, so with Morgan’s indulgence I will run a topic on the “Members Bike Projects” forum (so as not to clog up the very active R&T forum) documenting my progress DAILY on The Plan, viz.

“Spend two quality hours a day on the projects that need completing”.


That’s it. Simple, eh? It’s Shaun’s idea. I’ve seen it work, I know it works, but I’ve not ever done it, and I need to do it, because I really do still enjoy this hobby, and I really do want to move forward and have the bikes I love to ride ready to go, and not have them languish for decades “getting ready to get ready”.

So my goal is to:

- Spend two solid hours 5 days a week in the shop working on the top-priority project.

- If the top-priority project stalls due to needing parts or sending work out, I’ll drop to the next-priority project and make it the top one until the parts are in and the top-priority work is re-enabled..

- I’ll take a picture or two each day to document what I’m doing, and post it/them to this thread.

- If I DON’T spend those two hours in the shop, I’ll post WHY I didn’t, and see if it looks like a sad and pitiful excuse when I look at it in writing, or if it’s real and a good reason.

This being a public forum, people may have all sorts of comments. Or not. Encouragement, maybe. Or “Why are you wasting board bandwidth with your self-indulgent moaning?”, that will be fine too. “Your shop’s a damn mess, get it straight so you can get some proper work done.” is expected. Or ignore it, or just look at it and laugh and move on.

Tomorrow Sunday February 11 2018 is day One.

Lannis


"Why do you wear that thing, Dobby?" "This, sir? 'Tis a mark of the house-elf’s enslavement, sir."
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I think half the point of this section of the board is to be a little self indulgent! I wish you the best of luck with your new plan and look forward to seeing the projects progress.

Rod


And pray that there's intelligent life somewhere up in space
'Cause there's bugger all down here on Earth'

An interesting point given recent events.

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Part of the trouble I was having with projects was collecting more projects big and little. Took stock unloaded quite a few, even gave some away to people who would do them, stopped thinking about new ones and am now starting to get somewhere with the ones I felt were important. Unfortunately I'm procrastinating letting go of a matchless g80 I pulled apart 30yrs ago but in all honesty I can't see myself getting to it......but !!!!
Good on you for doing your program. I would do my 2 hrs early in the morning so no one or thing can thief your time.

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"An hour in the morning is worth two in the afternoon". too true, allows the rest of the day for rumination. ,I find myself flitting from one job to another with no real logic, as long as you do a wee bit every day stuff happens, best of luck Lannis. Keeping a thread running here is a useful spur, the help from others is priceless, and its handy as a memory jogger. I occasionally resort to the 40 knot string to keep focused , particularly when stuff is in a million bits and scattered around and the tasks start looking monumental, mental rehearsal of the job chosen at each knot before turning in for the night. This might be classed as witchcraft, but it works for me, I only use it for bike stuff.

Last edited by gavin eisler; 02/11/18 3:35 pm.

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Being 68 and not as lucky in "successful jobs leading to a fun retirement" I still have to work a little to help my retirement funds cover all our expenses and found out the same thing - morning hours are the best to work professionally and on my project ( which is only one, after selling a BSA ).
Another thing I found lately - attending mobility classes with my wife and lately special movement lab for people over 55 helped a lot with amount of energy I had during working and everyday life. Yesterday taking stairs pretty lightly and feeling some springs in the old legs. Seems like not about the thread subject, but I thing it is smile.

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Cold and nasty outside but the shop is bright, even warm, so did my first Two Hour Session. The A10 was already up on the lift, so I started with that.

Coming home from Ohio last year in the rain, the lights went out. So I’m working on the electricals.

[Linked Image]

The wires to the headlight switch had fractured after many years of hard service. (The bike is only 57 years old; damned Lucas quality they always complain about!) I took the switch out and cleaned it up with electronics cleaner and it clicks and switches nicely, very low resistance, so I’m calling that good (and that’s a good thing because they’re expensive). But the pilot socket looks rocky, and I need an upgrade to the lighting. I already have an LED bulb in back, so I’ll look for an upgrade to the front …

[Linked Image]

It still has the old mechanical voltage regulator. I’m sorry, old cock … you’ve done a good job for a long time and you’re still regulating nicely, but there’s no sense in “running to failure” when you’re running on darkening West Virginia back roads 400 miles from home, so you’re getting updated …

[Linked Image]

The ammeter is rattling in its case and is deader than Stonewall Jackson's horse, so need another one of those, just for tradition's sake, not because they do any good.

Put the battery on a 6-amp charge and it seems to be taking it well, so it’s probably going to be OK for another year ….

[Linked Image]

So after a two-hour fettling session, I’ve made a little list of things that need replacing … maybe one of our vendors will have an order blank already filled up for me! Or not.

[Linked Image]

So for the next session, the A10 will come off the lift and something else goes up while parts come in.

This was a Sunday, so Day 2 will either be Monday or Tuesday ….

Lannis


"Why do you wear that thing, Dobby?" "This, sir? 'Tis a mark of the house-elf’s enslavement, sir."
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While you're into the wiring, why not bite the bullet and put it back better than new?

The original coloured wires with tracer, non-insulated terminals, bullets and connectors and professional crimping tools are available from Vehicle Wiring Products and Auto Sparks in the UK, and I'm sure there are US suppliers as well.

Adding a mini-relay for the headlight takes a lot of load off the switch gear. Stuart likes a pair of SPST relays, I prefer a single SPDT with low beam on the "normally on" terminal.

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Sorry Lannis but I have to agree with Shane. At the bare minimum I would be ditching them bloody awful, cheap and nasty, Mickey Mouse crimp terminals in favour of some proper quality items properly crimped. I'm also a bit fussy about wire colours but unless the current ones are in poor condition it's a lot of work for not much return.

Rod


And pray that there's intelligent life somewhere up in space
'Cause there's bugger all down here on Earth'

An interesting point given recent events.

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The more pre-insulated crimps you use, the sooner your lights will go out again.


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I'm in complete agreement about the electric terminals, the ones that go back on are going to be ratchet-crimped proper ones.

In actuality, though, the ones that failed were old (possibly original) setscrew-clamped connections on the headlight switch; I'll be extra careful putting those back .....

Lannis


"Why do you wear that thing, Dobby?" "This, sir? 'Tis a mark of the house-elf’s enslavement, sir."
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Originally Posted by Shane in Oz
While you're into the wiring, why not bite the bullet and put it back better than new?

The original coloured wires with tracer, non-insulated terminals, bullets and connectors and professional crimping tools are available from Vehicle Wiring Products and Auto Sparks in the UK, and I'm sure there are US suppliers as well.

Adding a mini-relay for the headlight takes a lot of load off the switch gear. Stuart likes a pair of SPST relays, I prefer a single SPDT with low beam on the "normally on" terminal.


I've done exactly that (a pair of SPST relays) on my 12V Firebird. I may do it on this one too ....

Lannis


"Why do you wear that thing, Dobby?" "This, sir? 'Tis a mark of the house-elf’s enslavement, sir."
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Don't literally bite all the bullet connectors.


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Originally Posted by triton thrasher
Don't literally bite all the bullet connectors.


Yes, I'll be sure to use a pair of crimping pliers. I've watched Shaun take off a bottle cap with his teeth, and my Fay can cut the toughest cord or twine with her razor-sharp canines, but I'm saving mine for chewing food .... !

Lannis


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Originally Posted by triton thrasher
The more pre-insulated crimps you use, the sooner your lights will go out again.


Whenever I use them I slice the plastic sleeve off and replace it with shrink tube.


When given the choice between two evils I picked the one I haven't tried before
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these are the highest quality crimp terminals i have ever used.

[Linked Image]

https://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/elpages/knifedisc.php

these are mechanically inseparable. if you wrap them in self-vulcanizing tape and cover in 3M, you will never have an electrical issue. they go together and come apart a million times without damage or wear because you don't pull on them to get them apart.

i used them at sea to power the solenoids triggering the air guns on geophysical ships, and while the solenoids failed all the time, the connectors were flawless.

i'm a big fan of marine and aerospace electrical supplies. here's another:

https://www.jamestowndistributors.c...+Adhesive+Lined+Heat+Shrinking+Snap+Plug

this stuff is expensive, but it's a one-shot fix. search for aircraft or marine electrical.

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It's not too expensive to buy a bunch of connectors with separate sleeves and proper crimping tool - will serve you with all the rest of the projects.
What I'd do is ditching all the loom and changing to 12V by buying different regulator, battery, proper front H4 Wipac or Lucas light unit.
Lucas generator is marginal anyway but conversion to 12V don't makes it worse than before.
That is if I used this bike to ride.
I have A10 service sheets and electrical system there is simplicity itself.

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Originally Posted by Adam M.
It's not too expensive to buy a bunch of connectors with separate sleeves and proper crimping tool - will serve you with all the rest of the projects.
What I'd do is ditching all the loom and changing to 12V by buying different regulator, battery, proper front H4 Wipac or Lucas light unit.
Lucas generator is marginal anyway but conversion to 12V don't makes it worse than before.
That is if I used this bike to ride.
I have A10 service sheets and electrical system there is simplicity itself.


I've considered that (strongly) since I DO use this bike to ride, but I've always been told that the generator would need to be rewound to be reliable with 12 V.

Others say that it really doesn't make any difference. Since the generator is not supplying juice for anything except the headlight, tiny little speedo light, and a 4-watt LED taillight, the 60W from the stocker is probably enough, but I don't know enough about the electro-mechanical strain on a 6V generator that's being asked for 12V, or if anyone has had any experience with them either going bad or working fine in the real world on a 12V conversion ... ?

Lannis


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If the 6 V system is working for you, you may as well stick with it.

Running the 6 V dynamo at 12 V can get you more watts, but it won't start charging until at higher rpm, so you can lose more than you gain.

Don't throw the old control box away. You may not like the electronic regulator. Most electronic ones drain the battery at low rpm and refuse to charge a very flat battery.


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Originally Posted by triton thrasher
If the 6 V system is working for you, you may as well stick with it.

Running the 6 V dynamo at 12 V can get you more watts, but it won't start charging until at higher rpm, so you can lose more than you gain.

Don't throw the old control box away. You may not like the electronic regulator. Most electronic ones drain the battery at low rpm and refuse to charge a very flat battery.


I'll keep the old box. I keep all my old working Lucas stuff. I converted my '69 Firebird to a Podtronics regulator 12 years ago, and put the old rectifier and Zeners on the shelf. Then a couple years ago, my Norton quit charging. I tested the Norton rectifier, it was shorted, so I took the old BSA rectifier off the shelf and installed it and it's charging again like a good 'un.

I'll have a voltmeter on board the A10 for a while ... if it's not doing right, I'll go back to the old way. But wait! I'm getting a new -12 to +12 Ammeter for the nacelle, the most accurate diagnostic instrument available! No problem, then.

It's a BSA. I know better than do any "low rpm" riding, anyhow ...

Lannis


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get modern connecters from cycle terminals with the proper crimper.

But really, you'd get a lot more work done if YOU WEREN.T ALWAYS POSTING ON [email protected]!!

12,370 POSTS? come on man, step away from the keyboard.


Rich
"It's not always about going fast. Sometimes it's nice to slow down" (Wendy E.2016)

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Originally Posted by Richrd
get modern connecters from cycle terminals with the proper crimper.

But really, you'd get a lot more work done if YOU WEREN.T ALWAYS POSTING ON [email protected]!!

12,370 POSTS? come on man, step away from the keyboard.


It's worse than that; Morgan zeroed the counter when it was at about 5,000 or so, so it's more like 18,000.

But two things, young Britbike Padawan Learner, you must understand; first of all, that's about 18 years worth, so 1000 a year. Secondly, I was the only boy in my senior high school class that took Typing. The other boys razzed me about "taking a guuurrlll's class" until they realized it was me and 19 girls in the room. A side benefit was that I can type fast enough to make some people's head spin, so my 3 posts a day take me about 5 minutes to enter. Pictures are a little longer but they don't all have pictures ....

Lannis


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Day 2 – A10 parts to be ordered, so decided to move over to the Moto Guzzi, which has been hanging from a chain fall in the Tonti-frame Moto Guzzi “crabbed” position for transmission removal and clutch replacement for … oh, a LOT more years than it should have been.

[Linked Image]

[Linked Image]

I have a box full of new parts – clutch, flywheel, swingarm bearings, rear crankshaft main seal, I don’t know what all, I’ll have to look through them again. The bike went on the rack when the clutch suddenly seized solid as I rolled in from work one day …

[Linked Image]

No fancy technical stuff here … just need to get everything clean enough to work on – the transmission, the clutch housing, and the engine, because I’m going to replace the rear engine main seal while I’m in here. It’s not leaking, but the bike has 41,000 miles on it, and it’s a cheap part, and it’s the biggest pain in the arse in the world of motorcycling (well, close) to get the thing to this point, so might as well replace it.

But first, everyone who has Been There Done That will recognize the pan, brushes, shop rags, and gallon of WD 40 that will occupy my time for the next 4 – 6 hours sorting 10 years of spooge, road dirt, and grease …

[Linked Image]

So that’s two days of Two Hour Plan …. !

Lannis


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Two V twins , one of which is a Matchless, and a Morgan, Lannis ! Do you feel you might have a subliminal message here?
Visions of a Morgan Super Sport in the Lannis workshop !

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Originally Posted by Triless
Two V twins , one of which is a Matchless, and a Morgan, Lannis ! Do you feel you might have a subliminal message here?
Visions of a Morgan Super Sport in the Lannis workshop !


I've long thought that the V-twin in its various manifestations is an ideal motorcycle engine configuration, whether transverse crank like the Harleys and Ducatis, or longitudinal crank like the Guzzis.

I've owned three Harleys, and I'd own several now (an early Panhead, an early Sportster, and a '83 Shovelhead dresser, probably) .... if it weren't for the company I'd be keeping; Lord knows I tried. They're nice basic motorcycles ... and the same clutch fits a '48 through an '84 Big Twin. The opposite of planned obsolescence!

Lannis


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Originally Posted by NickL
If you decide to go for a 12v set-up, you are best off replacing the Field coil at least, really you should
change the armature as well or you will suffer from the problem that TT says, low charge till the revs are up.
Some of the reg units around are very crude devices and will not switch on without a good battery, they also have
no current limiting so will allow the dynamo to overheat. The DVR3 seems like a good choice, i won't mention the
ones i make...........


I think that since all that the 6V system is used for is lights (no plans for EI, device chargers, etc) I'll stick with the 6V and go with the wiring, light, and regulator suggestions.

Nasty and cold today, didn't feel like heating up the shop, ran into town, did some errands, and experimented with my new Smoker with a nice pork butt ... cut up some apple tree branch prunings, smoked it for 6 hours, it came out VERY nice with no rub, brining, or anything but the apple smoke ....

Lannis Day 3


"Why do you wear that thing, Dobby?" "This, sir? 'Tis a mark of the house-elf’s enslavement, sir."
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