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Re: Mods for long distance reliability
David Reid #527437 02/10/14 11:59 pm
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...alright, you are just on the road, good luck;
--in my opinion, the electrical part is always a drama, so in my motorcycles I cut it down to a new magneto, so no more electrical problems, no more coils, no more battery no more zener diode, etc
-a regulator with a battery eliminator for the lights.
new carbs,
and a liquid that goes inside the tires that avoid ALL types of punctures; I do not know if sell this in USA; you put it only one time.

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Re: Mods for long distance reliability
SEATTLE GS #527477 02/11/14 8:24 am
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Originally Posted by SEATTLE GS
while the chromoly pushrods do not add reliability, they certainly do not make it less reliable. The do make the top end less noisy and I would much rather listen to the exhaust than the valve clatter. The chromoly pushrods are racer stuff so most people never operate in the range to feel any benefit but they are cheap and easy to install.
Brand new tires and tubes are the way to go..and a fresh battery.

I have steel pushrods in my race Triumph...The cold valve lash is less as Pete says.....Are they less noisy than the stock items? My bike has Sifton cams that likely is more clattery than the stock cams but I would say the clatter is more solid sounding at idle...
Smith Bros in Oregon makes the finest steel pushrods available, a set of four Triumph rods is about 36 bucks. Johnson Cams most likely buys them from Smith.


79 T140D, 96 900M Ducati ,61 A10 .On a bike you can out run the demons..
“But I don't want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked. “Oh, you can't help that,” said the Cat: “we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.
Re: Mods for long distance reliability
David Reid #527631 02/12/14 12:16 am
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for shimming pushrod tubes. My end goal is to get about .015 squeeze on the square section O rings or standard O ring. No squeeze and it leaks. Too much squeeze and the head can actually bend over the pushrods. And the square section O ring pushes out of position. It was a lousy system. So I want just enough squeeze to do the job. Since most Triumph motors by this time have been mixed and matched I take nothing for granted.Different tubes, different lifter blocks, different heads...it is a minefield. 1969? and above motors are different but can still benefit from shimming. USE THE WEDDING BAND. The best way to go is to have custom shims made and there are several companies out there that will do small jobs. I used to cut them out of shim stock by hand (soft drink cans can work too)But it is difficult.
the shims just fit over the lifter block and just smaller than the wedding band. To determine the amount, set the pushrod tube in place WITH JUST THE TOP O RING. Bolt the head on with the head gasket ...you only need the center bolts. Slide the pushrod tube as far up as you can. The resulting gap below the pushrod tube is the space you need to take up. Measure this gap and measure the square O ring to determine the amount of shims needed..and figure in .015 squeeze. Usually the rings provided are too thick and too thin...it takes some thinking.

Re: Mods for long distance reliability
reverb #527638 02/12/14 2:13 am
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Originally Posted by reverb
...alright, you are just on the road, good luck;
--in my opinion, the electrical part is always a drama, so in my motorcycles I cut it down to a new magneto, so no more electrical problems, no more coils, no more battery no more zener diode, etc
-a regulator with a battery eliminator for the lights.
new carbs,
and a liquid that goes inside the tires that avoid ALL types of punctures; I do not know if sell this in USA; you put it only one time.


I would disagree about the magneto. I don't see the alternative items you list you list (coils, points, zener) as being game stoppers however if you're far from home and some of the unusual items in a magneto fail, you're in a world of pain! help

Re: Mods for long distance reliability
Adrian1 #527644 02/12/14 2:45 am
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I'd disagree with the magneto too.It still has a coil and condensor,and only one of each.
I've never had trouble with a 12V Lucas coil,although I have seen one in my life that needed changing.I have had condensor trouble,but at least with standard points and coils you have 2 coils and 2 condensors.It was about a 40 mile ride on one cylinder,until I could find another condensor (which happened to fit a car,but did the job).If I rode below 60 mph,it would still run on both cylinders with one bad condensor.

I've never had a zener fail,but a friend of mine did.You can disconnect it and turn the headlight on,but don't exceed 3000 rpm or you'll overcharge the battery.

Re: Mods for long distance reliability
Pete R - R.I.P. #527738 02/12/14 1:44 pm
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Originally Posted by Adrian1
I would disagree about the magneto.
Originally Posted by Pete R
I'd disagree with the magneto too.
I agree with the magneto. But, then again, I would, wouldn't I? This sort of magneto/nonmagneto discussion can easily turn from a technical discussion into a which oil-is-best exchange of opinions. So, before that happens, technically speaking magnetos have fewer components that could fail and bring a bike to a halt than points/coil systems.

Additional issues with the non-magneto way of proceeding are a battery that dies, a rotor whose magnets come adrift from the hub, and a short just about anywhere in the wiring system (blowing the fuse as well as the sole spare fuse you're carrying because you installed it before finding and fixing the short). If you add in owner-installed electronic ignition systems, that's yet another item with non-negligible chance of failure. Being self-contained, a properly rebuilt magneto is immune to all of these.

I'm not saying the above to be argumentative. I have old bikes with and without magnetos. I love them all, but I prefer ones with magnetos for their reliability.

Re: Mods for long distance reliability
David Reid #527747 02/12/14 2:18 pm
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I put a condenser block from a triple on my Bonnie. If one fails, just move the wire onto the spare.




Bob M.
Re: Mods for long distance reliability
David Reid #527774 02/12/14 4:40 pm
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Apologies to OP for hijack smile

Magnetoman, whille there may be more items to fail in coil points setup my point is that fixing a magneto in a remote area is more difficult (even if you carry spares). Failed slip rings, carbon brushes, stripped gears etc. As you say, a properly rebuilt magneto will be reliable but these are few and far between. smile

Re: Mods for long distance reliability
Magnetoman #527795 02/12/14 6:40 pm
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Originally Posted by Magnetoman
Additional issues with the non-magneto way of proceeding are a battery that dies, a rotor whose magnets come adrift from the hub, and a short just about anywhere in the wiring system (blowing the fuse as well as the sole spare fuse you're carrying because you installed it before finding and fixing the short). If you add in owner-installed electronic ignition systems, that's yet another item with non-negligible chance of failure. Being self-contained, a properly rebuilt magneto is immune to all of these.
All true MMan, but at least on mine I put in a fuse block with individual circuits, which cuts down on the "short just about anywhere" scenario. Also, I barely know how to spell mugnato, so I guess I'm better off with my Boyer system. I'm still too young in the world of running Triumphs to really know yet. Hey, it feels good to be young at least in one sense of the word. laughing

Ray


'64 TR6R Plus some Twins from other countries (U.S., Germany, Japan)
Re: Mods for long distance reliability
Magnetoman #527808 02/12/14 7:54 pm
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There is some truth in what you say MM.It sort of comes down to whether the magnet and primary cicuit in a magneto is more reliable than the magnet and stator in the standard alternator.

I've never had short circuit problems,but it could happen.

One other point is that a Joe Hunt magneto (or similar) on a unit Triumph is permanently locked at full advance (no advance curve).This might be less than satisfactory at start up.Some might not like the kick-back,with anything less than a swift kick and a closed throttle.There will also be more likelihood of detonation below 3500 rpm,and it's hard to avoid with a hot engine from a standing start.

Re: Mods for long distance reliability
David Reid #527818 02/12/14 8:40 pm
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...hello PeteR, I asked that kick back question in the units (I have a Hunt in my pre unit and other Hunt in the unit that still waiting to fire) many times in other forum and all the guys who have it said that they do not have kickback problems.

I have been using mine for over 10 years without changing anything or any problem except one day that I passed by a flooded street. Half bike under the water and the magneto stopped, also raining; I put the bike aside pull off the cover passed a newspaper cleaned the contacts and one kick a the engine started again, all under slight rain.

However, ALL my buddies in these years have some type of trouble, mainly from the battery, condensers, coils, bad contacts in the distributor, cables, etc
all electrical problems
Simplicity is the key; new magneto have this, but a heavy price too. Also Hunt, Fairbanks type of mags are better than the British, less parts that have problems.
Plus I hate batteries; it s a totally outdated crap that still in all the vehicles but there s nothing to substitute it so if I can I try to not have them in my bikes.


Re: Mods for long distance reliability
reverb #527823 02/12/14 8:50 pm
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Hmmm... Pazon ignition, gel battery like my three other bikes,
fresh motor, good chain and sprockets, clean carbs, good wiring, attention to the bearings and fluids. An auto oiler would help on a long trip. A big part of long distance reliability is checking over your bike and replacing iffy parts. Worn parts are what I've seen break on long trips regardless of the make.

Re: Mods for long distance reliability
Pete R - R.I.P. #527832 02/12/14 9:20 pm
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Originally Posted by Pete R
There is some truth in what you say MM.It sort of comes down to whether the magnet and primary cicuit in a magneto is more reliable than the magnet and stator in the standard alternator.

I've never had short circuit problems,but it could happen.

One other point is that a Joe Hunt magneto (or similar) on a unit Triumph is permanently locked at full advance (no advance curve).This might be less than satisfactory at start up.Some might not like the kick-back,with anything less than a swift kick and a closed throttle.There will also be more likelihood of detonation below 3500 rpm,and it's hard to avoid with a hot engine from a standing start.


Pete, if your stator/rotor fail,you still have whatever power is left in the battery to get somewhere and even recharge it again when possible. If your magneto dies, you're dead in the water!

Re: Mods for long distance reliability
David Reid #527853 02/12/14 10:35 pm
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Thanx Seattle GS. I was also in touch with Brandon at Steadfast and he mentioned using a copper crush washer. I own an old lathe that I keep with my next door neighbor who is a master machinist. He provides adult supervision when I need to make something on it. Now that I visualize what you are describing I may be able to make something that works. Sounds like I need to have a session and lap the surfaces of the rocker boxes and come up with a fix on the pushrod tubes. I'm convinced now of keeping my current compression. I may do those pushrods while I'm at it. She doesn't need em, but it's just another little refinement.


Of course it vibrates…what of it? If vibration is so bad then explain how the adult toy industry has done so well.

2004 Harley Davidson Sportster
1966 Triumph Bonneville
1971 Bultaco Alpina 250
Re: Mods for long distance reliability
Adrian1 #527982 02/13/14 2:54 pm
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Originally Posted by Adrian1
Originally Posted by Pete R
There is some truth in what you say MM.It sort of comes down to whether the magnet and primary cicuit in a magneto is more reliable than the magnet and stator in the standard alternator.

I've never had short circuit problems,but it could happen.

One other point is that a Joe Hunt magneto (or similar) on a unit Triumph is permanently locked at full advance (no advance curve).This might be less than satisfactory at start up.Some might not like the kick-back,with anything less than a swift kick and a closed throttle.There will also be more likelihood of detonation below 3500 rpm,and it's hard to avoid with a hot engine from a standing start.


Pete, if your stator/rotor fail,you still have whatever power is left in the battery to get somewhere and even recharge it again when possible. If your magneto dies, you're dead in the water!


All my charging, coil ignition and magneto ignition problems have given fair warning that they were coming, except the Tufnol gear.

If something mysterious fails within the bowels of the magneto, it doesn't take all that much to convert it to trigger a double ended coil!

All the different systems are reliable, really.

If they're built or installed by idiots, they're all unreliable!


Amateur Loctite enthusiast.
Re: Mods for long distance reliability
triton thrasher #529564 02/21/14 8:52 pm
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Just to add a note. I was out on the bike recently and as I was buzzing down the freeway, it just shut down….no warning. It was as if I had just reached down and turned the ignition off. It turned out to be the positive lead going to my Tri-Spark ignition. It was a crimped spade connector that had come loose. It is now crimped, soldered and shrink-wrapped and that is rolled up in a nice little leather burrito. I'm hopeful that this will do the trick.


Of course it vibrates…what of it? If vibration is so bad then explain how the adult toy industry has done so well.

2004 Harley Davidson Sportster
1966 Triumph Bonneville
1971 Bultaco Alpina 250
Re: Mods for long distance reliability
David Reid #529569 02/21/14 9:16 pm
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Hi David,

Originally Posted by David Reid
I was buzzing down the freeway, it just shut down….no warning.
It was a crimped spade connector that had come loose.

Was it a terminal like one of these? If so, they are utter, total and complete junk; I've lost count of these I've replaced ... they are useless. mad Use terminals and insulators like these, terminals crimped with the 'M'-shaped cut-away in the jaws and you'll never have a problem. :bigt

Hth.

Regards,

Re: Mods for long distance reliability
Stuart #529572 02/21/14 9:43 pm
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It was the second type of connector, but evidently not crimped very well. Also, I had failed to put anything like a piece of hose or foam rubber in between the CDI and the points cover as per Tri-Spark's instructions, so it was really my fault.


Of course it vibrates…what of it? If vibration is so bad then explain how the adult toy industry has done so well.

2004 Harley Davidson Sportster
1966 Triumph Bonneville
1971 Bultaco Alpina 250
Re: Mods for long distance reliability
David Reid #529693 02/22/14 3:26 pm
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Hi David,

Originally Posted by David Reid
It was the second type of connector, but evidently not crimped very well.

I forgot to ask (duh! frown ) ...

With the 'M'-crimp terminals, do you bare just enough conductor to fit under the smaller pair of tabs (say about 1/4" length)? If so, if the terminal isn't sized to the conductor (e.g. many terminal suppliers will stock only a 28-strand terminal and expect it to be used on all cable sizes from 28-strand down to 9-strand frown ), the crimping tool can't squeeze the terminal down enough to grip the conductor. cry

Trick here is to bare double the length of conductor (say about 1/2"), twist the strands together and fold the bared twisted conductor in half. Then, when you crimp the terminal, if the shorter tabs are aimed between the two halves of the folded conductor, the cable will never pull out of the terminal. :bigt

Hth.

Regards,

Re: Mods for long distance reliability
Stuart #529698 02/22/14 4:07 pm
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Originally Posted by Stuart
Was it a terminal like one of these? If so, they are utter, total and complete junk; I've lost count of these I've replaced ... they are useless. mad

+1 for this excellent description of junk terminals that have no place on a motorcycle.

Re: Mods for long distance reliability
Excalibur #529807 02/23/14 8:49 am
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Originally Posted by Excalibur
Originally Posted by Stuart
Was it a terminal like one of these? If so, they are utter, total and complete junk; I've lost count of these I've replaced ... they are useless. mad

+1 for this excellent description of junk terminals that have no place on a motorcycle.


That's for sure. Back in the early eighties I had my first motorcycle which was a mid-seventies Yamaha. It had a bunch of those things on it. I rarely had every thing working at the same time until someone taught me how to solder a connection and use shrink tube. I've never had that fail.


Of course it vibrates…what of it? If vibration is so bad then explain how the adult toy industry has done so well.

2004 Harley Davidson Sportster
1966 Triumph Bonneville
1971 Bultaco Alpina 250
Re: Mods for long distance reliability
David Reid #557786 08/11/14 5:19 am
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DID 530 VX x-ring chain and maybe a scottoiler.
I ride long distances and this summer was with the x-ring.
It completely eliminates chain adjusting while away from home/workshop and I´ll never go back to oldfashion chains again.


*******************
Run `em...
*******************
1969 T120
Re: Mods for long distance reliability
Stuart #557788 08/11/14 5:48 am
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Originally Posted by Stuart
Hi David,

Originally Posted by David Reid
I was buzzing down the freeway, it just shut down….no warning.
It was a crimped spade connector that had come loose.

Was it a terminal like one of these? If so, they are utter, total and complete junk; I've lost count of these I've replaced ... they are useless. mad Use terminals and insulators like these, terminals crimped with the 'M'-shaped cut-away in the jaws and you'll never have a problem. :bigt

Hth.

Regards,


Were this a democracy, I'd vote against pre-insulated crimps. They're treacherous!

I've just rewired my whole bike with Japanese sized W (or M) shaped ones, with slide-on sleeves. I'm almost good at crimping them now.


Amateur Loctite enthusiast.
Re: Mods for long distance reliability
Ducknaldo #557789 08/11/14 5:49 am
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Originally Posted by Ducknaldo
DID 530 VX x-ring chain and maybe a scottoiler.
I ride long distances and this summer was with the x-ring.
It completely eliminates chain adjusting while away from home/workshop and I´ll never go back to oldfashion chains again.


I use a non-O ring chain and steam cylinder oil. Makes a lovely mess.


Amateur Loctite enthusiast.
Re: Mods for long distance reliability
David Reid #557825 08/11/14 11:33 am
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Does anybody know if a DID VX-X fits a T140 transmition?

For reliability first I did was to change gears. I am using 21 trans and 40 rear sprockets and works great on my 77 T140. I used all the time to reach for the elusive six gear at 70 mph. For the chatter I am using the mushroom foot valve adjusters. It did quiet down the bike and it supposed to keep valve geometry. I use Rita electronic ignition and external oil filter. I don't recommend going down to 7.5 to 1 compression. I had a T140D and was always contemplating raising the compression ratio. I you are used to a good running bike, you will be dissapointed going down on compression. Less vibration but the power loss is not worth it.

William


ASE Automotive Master Tech.
Never regret anything in your life because at one point, that was what you wished for.
Always tell the truth, even if your voice shakes.
1977 T140V
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